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5 Ways to Boost Innovation

Creativity and innovation are often stymied because there just aren’t enough resources.

One of your responsibilities as a pragmatic leader is to make sure you remain within budget while ensuring your team is performing at its peak. You can’t throw every dollar at a project. You can’t get people all the support they would have in an ideal world. The sad truth is that supporting one project often means diverting resources from others.

You have to cut costs, save resources, and keep in step with a budget, all while trying to sponsor creativity and fuel innovation. It’s no easy juggling act.

Here are five strategies that will help you do it.

1. Forget about the bells and whistles

While Google and other tech companies have in-house chefs and ping pong tables, there’s no need to follow suit. You won’t be able to inspire much more creativity or innovation with expensive toys, nice workplace amenities, and other small perks.

In fact, employees may end up taking advantage of all the gifts and, worse, get used to the office luxuries. Too much of a good thing can even demotivate your team. Improving their equipment and adding little perks become the main goal, rather than the work they’re supposed to be doing. This happens all the time.

2. Don’t sew your wallet closed

Leaders often err on the side of too much cost-cutting. Too much belt-tightening can undermine the progress of your most important projects. When people feel they don’t have access to the resources they need to do their job, their enthusiasm will weaken. They may start rethinking whether they really want to stick with you and your agenda. To sustain momentum and move ahead, you have to make sure, as far as possible, that everyone has the tools they need or at least the possibility of attaining them in the future.

3. Don’t use more resources as a goal

Some leaders tempt teams with the promise of more resources if they can meet certain goals. That’s fine if the team can meet the goals, but it’s a different story entirely if they fail. Then they’re missed their goals, they don’t get their resources, and they end up feeling disappointed and resentful. And they can always argue that the reason they failed is because you didn’t give them enough resources to start with!

4. Educate and listen to the team

During projects, leaders should be very clear about the size of the budget, what’s going where, and why. If your expenditures aren’t transparent, team members may see certain purchases as wasteful or grow aggrieved when their bid for new resources is turned down.

The best way to figure out if your team is happy with their access to shared resources is to simply ask them. You may wish your team could work on vapors, but they can’t. You cannot afford to be insensitive to their needs.

5. Balance the allocation of resources

Don’t vacillate between feast and famine. Find the sweet spot where your team has the resources it needs to move ahead, but isn’t kicking back on your welfare system. Facilitate what they need, and scrutinize what they want. Don’t slam on the breaks and then hit the gas. Find a steady pace.

As a pragmatic leader, you need to make sure your group’s access to organizational resources doesn’t fall below a certain threshold-;from “hungry” to “discouraged.” There is no science here. There are no quantitative metrics. You have to be intuitive and sensitive to your group’s level of motivation and creativity.

Mobile Startups: Insights from Mobile India 2014 conference

The Mobile India 2014 conference, held recently in Bangalore, showcased a range of opportunities in the space of Social, Mobility, Analytics and Cloud (SMAC). In addition to SMAC, there are also opportunities opening up in security and smart sensors, leading some speakers to joke that the acronym SMAC should actually be SSMACS!

In an earlier article, we looked at the top trends in enterprise mobile as identified by speakers from the 2014 conference. The 2013 edition of the conference also featured a panel on mobile startups (see my coverage here).

Mobile FI

“Mobile is the centre, cloud is the backbone and analytics is the nerve centre of digital business,” said Manjunath Gowda, CEO, i7 networks. Here is my pick of the Top 15 tips for mobile startups, based on the discussions at the Mobile 2014 conference.

1. Focus on solving real business needs

We are living in an age of realtime information overload. $300,000 is spent on online shopping every minute; 600 videos are uploaded to YouTube each minute; Facebook has over 700,000 updates each minute; and Twitter generates 12 terabytes of data daily – and this is just the tip of the proverbial data iceberg. However, for analytics to make sense of this data  is much more than just statistics; it connects realtime occurrences to the big picture and to pressing business needs and insights. Many startups are going after the low-hanging fruit, but there is much more value in sensemaking and decision support.

“The key challenge today is the inability to think big and ask the right questions to make a difference to businesses,” observed Venkatesh Vaidyanathan, VP, Product Management, Business Analytics, SAP Labs.

For example, true benefits arise when startups connect Big Data to predictive maintenance, brand sentiment, threat detection, product recommendations, fraud detection, realtime risk mitigation, realtime demand/supply forecast, personalised care, and resource optimisation. In this regard, Bangalore company Ramyam Intelligence Lab is rightly positioned by offering analytics and Big Data solutions to telcos to help address their needs of personalisation, churn reduction, loyalty management, and cross-selling of services.

2. Tell a story

The business opportunity lies not just in crunching data and unearthing patterns but building a larger narrative, a compelling story. “There are stories lurking in data. Analyse it, capture it, tell a story from it, make it actionable,” urged S. Anand, Chief Data Scientist, Gramener.

Fields like analytics are as much art as science, and players entering this space need to mix analytics skills with IT. Winning customers will depend not on technical skills but on the ability to deliver insights, discovery and new business knowledge – and thus clinch deals with powerful stories.

3. Address enterprise mobile

Much attention understandably focuses on consumer apps, but there is a world of enterprise and productivity apps also fast emerging. Startups can show how SMAC can be used to improve field worker productivity, for white collar and even blue collar workers. Services offered as “also mobile” will become “mobile first” even in the enterprise environment.

More than 50% of employee devices are purchased on their own. 70% of professionals will use smartphones by 2018, said Archana Kamath, Manager, Mobile CoE, EMC Software and Services India. BYOI (Bring Your Own Identity) is the next wave of consumerisation of IT in enterprise space.

Mobile cloud and workflow tools are now becoming available for SMEs too, and a new wave of value is being unleashed. Mobiles give companies not just deep consumer insights but continuous consumer insights, according to Alwyn Lobo, Senior Mobility Solutions Architect, IBM.

4. Offer security solutions

The increasing digital nature of the economy is also creating chaos, and the ‘attack surface’ of businesses is increasing via mobile. This calls for tools and companies who can provide better monitoring and governance of enterprise networks. For example, Misys GeoGuard uses customer location to reduce fraud for banks. The SnapChat hacking incident shows API vulnerability in world of mobile. API security will play centre stage as mobiles become gateways in the Internet of Things, predicted Shreekanth Joshi, Vice President, Cloud Practice Head, Persistent Systems.

“Look out for Trojans like mRats, host-based jammers, and tunnel borers,” cautioned Manjunath Gowda, CEO, i7 networks. 71% of mobile devices have OS/app vulnerabilities, and there has been 600% growth in mobile malware over last couple of years. 90% of BYOD enabled Indian businesses had a mobile incident in last 12 months, according to sources cited by Gowda. This opens up new markets for security products and services.

5. Watch the competitive space

Startups should aim for a ‘blue ocean’ strategy and enter fresh waters – or else figure out a way to do things better, faster, easier and cheaper than existing players. Several existing players and case profiles were highlighted by Dr. Sanjoy Paul, IEEE Fellow and Managing Director, Accenture Technology Labs India: such as blippar (mobile ads with augmented reality), and use of analytics by Walmart to predict product demand and by Google to forecast ad keyword demand. This reflects the overall trend of increasing real time bidding (RTB) exchanges; static models are declining. Reach.ly mines Twitter to help hotels reach potential guests in real time. Coursera is using analytics to better serve learners. FitBit and OnStar are other good examples of realtime analytics in action.

6. Address the “Four Vs” of Big Data

Big Data is important because there is too much data and too little time for businesses to take informed decisions in realtime. Hence startups should find opportunity in one or more of the “four Vs” of Big Data: volume, variety, velocity, value. In other words, they should show business leaders how they can help tackle data overload, data diversity, realtime data, and mining of insights.

7. Watch sensor networks, M2M and IoT

The Internet of Things (IOT) is currently at early hype stage, but will soon become mainstream, as the recent Consumer Electronics Show indicated: this ranges from wearable devices to smart tennis rackets, and also opens the door to a new range of analytics products and services. Mobiles are cumulatively becoming sensor aggregators, said Shreekanth Joshi, Vice President, Cloud Practice Head, Persistent Systems.

In healthcare, for example, the ‘digitised patient’ will become the hub for measuring, modelling and predicting treatments based on instrumentation and on-body sensors. Typical M2M scenarios encompass energy and water meters, cars, cranes, vending machines, fridges, air-conditioners, and ATM machines. The ATM attack incident in Bangalore shows the importance of monitoring all locations via M2M, said S.Girish, COO, ConnectM.

8. Move beyond location to context

Location and context are blending together to create new kinds of mobile-powered services and advertising. For example, a Tokyo company recruits drivers for two-hour time slots in different neighbourhoods; the matching is based on proximity of available drivers. Analytics coupled with mobile is a powerful combination.

9. Choose cloud for scale

Cloud computing drastically reduces barriers to entry for infrastructure improvement for startups in the growth curve, as shown by the acceleration of companies such as Animoto. The costs for launching a startup and promoting it are much lower these days than before, thanks to cloud infrastructure and social media. However, it should be noted that the business fundamentals of team management and financial models remain unchanged.

10. Evolve from being aware to becoming smart

“Tomorrow’s enterprise is hyperconnected, super-aware, and borderless. Will it be smarter?” asked Ramesh Adiga, AVP & Head, Global Delivery, Mobility Unit, Infosys. The next stage of mobile evolution is ‘superphones’ driven by platforms and lifestyle devices.

Harrah’s Casino in Las Vegas is using Big Data in blackjack tables to figure out how to make gamblers comfortable and stay longer. Designer shoe store Meatpack in Guatemala uses realtime analytics to ‘hijack’ customers from competitors. “Analytics is changing the face of what we usually think of as mundane business,” said Sanjoy Paul of Accenture Labs. Startups need to go beyond ‘the usual suspects’ and identify opportunities right at the street corners and not just main street, and help clients move ‘from dashboards to decisions.’

11. Track emerging business models

The acquisition of Bangalore-based app optimisation company Little Eye Labs by Facebook for an estimated $15 million has shown that app infrastructure and ecosystems are also ripe targets for startup activity. An interesting model to watch is MBaaS – mobile backend as a service, as shown in app cost estimation and cloud models (Kinvey, Appcelerator, FeedHenry). Nicira can reconfigure physical network into multiple virtual networks.

12. Think big

Startup founders should not just look   at the idea or product but also the overall context, customer needs, scalability, UI/UX, andMobileIndia222 viral effects, advised Bharati Jacob, Founder Partner, Seedfund. For example, Limo service Uber may work well in Bangalore, but not have as much impact in Bombay where there are reliable taxis everywhere, she observed.

Many startups with good models focus largely on the local market and are not thinking global from the early stages. A few are, such as Zomato from India. “Maybe the Indian education system does not encourage us to think big and aim high,” added Jacob.

13. Make mobile marketing more targeted

Mobile marketers should stay away from the ‘spray and pray’ model of mainstream media, advised Ashvin Vellody, Partner, KPMG. There are numerous ways in which startups can help marketers experiment and refine ways of segmenting users and messages right down to, for example, passengers stranded  at airports and train stations.

14. Focus on social discovery and not social shopping

For a range of reasons, social shopping online has not worked well, but mobile social media has accelerated the discovery, inspiration and validation of online shopping, according to Kaushal Sarda, CEO, Kuliza Technologies. Social media is about conversations, so digital marketers and advertisers should figure out how to be part of or stimulate conversations, he advised.

15. Multiple mobile payment models will co-exist

Mobiles accelerate consumption of content and commerce, according to Ravi Pratap, Co-Founder and CTO, MobStack. “Multiple kinds of m-payment models will be needed in India, including via mobile operator billing as in the US,” said Pratap. Tier 3 and Tier 4 cities are takeoff markets for e-commerce in India, for everything from the latest books to lingerie sales, said Ashvin Vellody, Partner, KPMG. Retailers in India are executing their marketing campaigns on mobile social media now, not just PC-based Facebook, added Hrish Thota, Senior Manager, Social Computing, Happiest Minds.

In sum, mobile is pivotal to sense, influence and fulfill demand. “Mobiles will be ubiquitous and pervasive,” said Adiga of Infosys. But only an estimated 15% of Fortune 500 organisations have a concrete mobility strategy, opening up a wide door of opportunity for players in mobile space.

“Every business is a digital business, thanks to mobile, social, cloud and analytics. This is happening on a scale not possible before. SMAC helps companies simplify, accelerate, adapt and make better decisions,” said Accenture’s Paul.

Interesting questions to ponder – possibly at next year’s Mobile India conference – would be whether Facebook will be eclipsed by the next generation of social media, how cross-pollination between sectors will throw up new opportunities, and whether regulation and government may dampen the enthusiasm of the tech sector.

Innovations For Sustainability

In India, this quote by Yunus continues to be relevant even today as a majority of its population battles poverty. Socially focused ventures that provide innovations for low-income markets and create opportunities for a better lifestyle have however made significant progress in fighting this battle – especially since India got independence from colonial rule in 1947.

As India celebrates its 67th year of freedom it seems poignant to therefore pause and reflect on eight milestones that have played an important role in shaping India’s social enterprise landscape and the lessons they teach us.

1. Founding of Amul Dairy Co-operative (1946 – 1950)

The founding of the Kaira District Co-operative Milk Producers Union in 1946 and the Amul Dairy in 1950 has over the years given thousands of dairy farmers access to a wide range of domestic markets and spurred India’s milk revolution. The diagram explains in detail how the Amul co-operative benefits numerous dairy farmers across India.

 

Amul demonstrated that the elimination of middlemen and the professional management of milk procurement could result in low-income farmers getting access to new markets thereby lifting them out of poverty. While Amul was not conceived as a social enterprise, it is a historic example of supply chain management that is relevant even today.

2. Beginnings of Fabindia (1960)

Founded by John Bissell to market the diverse craft traditions of India, Fabindia started as a company exporting home furnishings. By linking over 80,000 craft based rural producers to modern urban markets, Fabindia impacted rural artisans at a scale similar to that of Amul for dairy farmers.

Fabindia’s unique ‘community owned company’ model that promotes inclusive capitalism can be credited for the impact they have created. By providing a minimum 26% shareholding to companies co-owned by artisan communities, Fabindia not only offered artisans a regular income but also dividends from the company’s growth. Today, with a pan-India presence, Fabindia is the largest private platform for products that derive from traditional crafts and knowledge.

3. Founding of Ashoka in India (1981)

Ashoka laid the foundation for the concept of social entrepreneurship around the world and started working in India in 1981. Their yearly batches of Changemakers – a community of social entrepreneurs that work to launch, refine and scale high potential ideas for low-income markets – has proven to be a successful model that has been adopted by several accelerators globally.

 

Ashoka’s establishment in India highlighted the importance of non-financial support in the form of networks, mentors and beyond to accelerate the growth of entrepreneurs working with innovations for low-income markets. Since inception in India, Ashoka has identified and worked with more than 350 fellows with innovative solutions from diverse fields and provided them access to funding, expertise and the global networks necessary to grow operations and scale impact.

4. Establishment of SELCO Solar (1995)

SELCO Solar was established with the mission to dispel the myth that low-income communities cannot afford or maintain sustainable technologies. SELCO resolved this challenge by not only creating low-cost solar solutions for lighting, water pumping and computing but also by providing a complete package of product, service and consumer financing through grameena banks, cooperative societies and micro finance institutions.

In a time when only a limited amount of financial and non-financial support was available to socially focused entrepreneurs and affordable solar power was a distant dream even in developed countries, SELCO not only sold and serviced solar lighting systems but also developed and scaled a business model for bringing rural services to poor families. In the past 18 years, SELCO has sold over 1,35,000 solar home lighting systems.

5. India’s First Impact Investments (2001)

It was in 2001 that Acumen Fund; a powerful catalyst for socially focused ventures internationally, brought its approach to India and made its debut investment in Aravind Eye Hospital. Acumen went on to open its India office in 2006 and has since invested USD$36 million in 26 different social companies in India.

In the same year, Vineet Rai also founded Aavishkaar, India’s first for-profit impact investment fund. Aavishkaar now oversees four investment funds and over 25 portfolio companies across sectors such as agriculture, dairy, healthcare, water, sanitation and beyond in India.

The introduction of both Aavishkaar and Acumen in India showcased the demand for early-stage investments in socially focused enterprises to scale both operations and social impact.

6. Social Enterprise Reaches Indian Universities (2007)

Education has often been seen as a stepping-stone towards positive change. The introduction of the Masters in Social Enterprise at one of India’s leading academic schools, the Tata Institute of Social Sciences in 2007 heralded a small but growing trend to provide formal training for entrepreneurs aspiring to create social change.

The founding of this masters program raised the academic profile for social enterprise as a career and created a viable pathway for the next generation of socially focused leaders.

7. Introduction of the Sankalp Summit (2009)

Sankalp Forum’s annual summit in 2009 was the first such event of its kind in India that brought together multiple stakeholders such as entrepreneurs, investors, experts and development partners to review the progress made within the sector and to set course for the future. It was initiated with the vision of catalyzing impact investments into social enterprises globally and has today evolved into a community of over 350 socially focused enterprises, 300 investors and 300 sector stakeholders.

The popularity of Sankalp Forum brought to the forefront the importance of local and regional events for the convergence of global knowledge and investment dialog necessary to further the inclusive ecosystem in India.

8. Passing of the Companies Bill (2013)

The passing of the Companies Bill and along with it the mandatory 2% of profits spend on CSR activities is a historic piece of legislation. While the impact of this spend has been a topic of much debate, including criticism that CSR is simply a public relations exercise, the new bill is an opportunity for Indian corporates to embrace a few large social problems that government benefits have been unable to resolve satisfactorily.

Moreover, the bill is aimed at providing important financial resources to NGO’s, social enterprises as well as incubators and accelerators with the ultimate intention being for corporates to play a greater role in eradicating social problems such as hunger and lack of education which continue to fester in India.

Steve Jobs – though unrelated to social enterprise – said, “You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in the future.”

Similarly, not only do these eight milestones define India’s social enterprise landscape but they also act as important opportunities for reflection on the way forward – for entrepreneurs, investors, accelerators and governments alike.

How to do business in rural India?

India’s fast-paced growth has been a topic of much debate and discussion in the last few years. As a result of booming sectors such as IT, there is a growing sense that the country is emerging as a global leader. As a result, at times India is being touted as the mecca of ‘Jugaad’ innovations – a term used to describe the process of finding innovative solutions to problems with limited resources.

However, as only 12% of India’s population lives in cities, the remaining 88% of people are not reaping many of the economic benefits from the country’s evolving leadership status and associate growth. Rural poverty remains rampant; as a result, innovative thinking is required to meet the needs of India’s majority.

At Ennovent we spoke with Mr. Pradeep Kashyap, the CEO and Founder of MART – India’s leading emerging markets consulting firm about the opportunities and challenges of creating innovations for rural Indian markets:

The term ’India Shining’ has been given to India’s progress in recent years; does opportunity exist for entrepreneurs in rural Indian markets?

Yes, significant opportunity exists in rural India. ‘India Shining’ was a term coined by the government to showcase the economic development of largely urban India. However, in more recent years rural growth has outstripped that of urban. For example, in recent years fast moving consumer good (FMCG) growth in rural India has been around 17 – 18% as compared to only around 11 – 12% in urban India. This is also reflected in industries such as durables and automobiles.

Rural India is now a one trillion dollar economy – equal to the economy of Canada or South Korea. If you add towns with populations below one million then the rural and small towns economy accounts for 75% of India’s GDP while the 50 top cities representing urban India contribute only 25% to the country’s GDP.

What are the factors driving consumption in rural India?

Approximately 800 million people live in rural India of which at least half earn less than USD 1 per day. The other half earn between USD 1 to 5 per day. There are only 50 million ‘rich’ people in rural India – meaning those that earn more than 5 dollars per day.

The consumption story in rural India is being driven by different factors in varying income segments. The rural employment guarantee scheme has added significantly to the purchasing power of the poor through the 6 billion dollars paid as wages annually. Simultaneously, the wage rate for private work in rural India has also gone up because of the higher wages paid under the Employment Guarantee Scheme; the poor are getting more days of work at higher daily rates.

Similarly, the middle-income segment has benefitted from better road connectivity. Youth living in these areas have bought motorcycles and taken up more lucrative jobs in nearby towns. The rapid urbanization has also benefitted the rich farmers who have sold their land at exorbitant rates to real estate developers particularly around the metros.

Doing business in rural India is often termed as challenging. Could you give your thoughts on how entrepreneurs can cope with distribution and other related challenges?

Rural India is diverse, heterogeneous and spread over half a million villages – this is a daunting task for any marketer. However, there are only 100,000 villages with populations of over 200 people. These villages not only account for 50% of the total rural population but also account for 60% of rural wealth. If companies begin by focusing on these 100,000 locations first the distribution nightmare can be effectively tackled.

Additionally, rural India can be categorized into 3 development segments with the most developed states being Punjab, Haryana, Maharashtra, Gujarat and Kerala – with all the remaining states are being in the developing category. Due to the higher per capita income, it is recommended that companies begin by focus on rural areas in the developed states first and then move across the country.

What are the lessons entrepreneurs can learn from large brands such as Ghari or Thums Up that have successfully penetrated these markets?

Most multi-national companies make the mistake of bringing international brands and tweaking them slightly for rural consumers – however the rural eco system is significantly different. For example, running water is not available and high voltage fluctuations and power outages render traditional products such as washing machines and televisions unattractive.

Regional brands, on the other hand, offer customized solutions. Jolly TV has captured the market in Uttar Pradesh by offering a battery backup and voltage stabilizer system. The battery gets charged when electricity is available and the television runs on battery when the family wants to watch programs during power cuts. Ghari detergent customized it’s offering by studying the water map of India to add softener and whitener according to the quality of water.

Entrepreneurs have to realize that each state in India is the size of a country in Europe and therefore it is important to develop product and marketing strategies state-wise. Engaging regularly at the grassroots level with consumers also gives entrepreneurs’ deep insights and feedback on how customers perceive the value of the product, which is otherwise not easily available.

For international entrepreneurs working in low-income markets looking to establish their footprint in India what is your advice to localize their business model?

The most important point is that international entrepreneurs must co-create products in partnership with local communities to understand and incorporate on-ground realities. As a result, hiring local talent that understands the culture and consumer behavior of these markets is key. I would also recommend that since India is a large country, entrepreneurs should first pick one state to begin operations and then consider expansion.Rural India is developing quickly. To succeed in such remote communities, small and large enterprises alike must be localized, offering innovative product and services based on a strong regional background. Early-stage enterprises also require a strong support network from innovation accelerators such as Ennovent and consulting firms such as MART. It is through the provision of a range of financial and non-financial support services that the best innovations for sustainability can succeed in low-income rural markets.

Content is Key to Internet

Internet landscape in India is transforming very fast thanks to mobile penetration. The latest IAMAI report says India has 200 million internet users. As of June 2013, India had 873.36 million mobile subscribers of which 176.5 million users accessed internet through their mobile device.  Every month India adds three million mobile internet users.

Trends

The media in India is focusing a lot on e-commerce portals for the past few years but there is a considerable amount of activity in the content space too.

Content portals are not limited to news and entertainment alone. That was true a decade ago but now there are several speciality portals, or verticals, in content space – lifestyle, automobile, education, sports, health. Comscore reports repeatedly demonstrate that the consumption of content portals is on the rise. This is expected because internet now is used by all sections of the society – students, professionals, retired people and women.

But there is a huge misconception even today that internet is largely for English speaking people. We at Oneindia have been investing in the language space for over a decade now. Language portals did not take off for a long time because internet penetration was limited to Tier-1 cities. Today, with mobile internet being available at affordable prices, we see a huge surge in consumption of various online services, leading to a number of trends as described below.

1. Infographics

The attention span of readers is shrinking by the day. Alerts from Facebook, Twitter, SMS, and phone calls all interrupt you while reading long-form content. Users want to get the same amount of information but not necessarily in text form – especially as an infographic.

Creating good infographics can be expensive as you need resources with various skills. A designer cannot create a good infographic unless an analytics person presents the information.

2. Content for mobile

Earlier we created content for the desktop user. Mobile data in India became popular by way of SMS; many SMS companies grew aggressively but they died because of the government regulations (SMS limit and DND list).

According to the latest reports, the mobile internet user base is bigger than the desktop internet user base in India. The presentation of content has to be different for a mobile and tablet device. Are publishers geared up for that?

3. WhatsApp replaces SMS

We love anything that is “free”. WhatsApp was the perfect product we were looking for. BBM from BlackBerry offered a similar functionality but limited the circle to BlackBerry users. The cross platform availability of WhatsApp is very attractive. Major political parties are using WhatsApp for interacting with their volunteers. Content publishers should look at generating content to share on WhatsApp with the hope it would get viral.

4. Responsive design

Responsive design (RD) is one of the best ways to render the same content differently depending upon the type of device. While RD is not difficult for simple sites it can get tricky while implementing for complex sites. The best way to tackle RD is by coming to terms with what will be displayed for desktop user vs. a mobile user. It is not necessary to display every pixel of your busy homepage for a mobile user; instead render a simpler version of your homepage for a mobile device while still maintaining the same URL.

5. Content for social media

Content publishers will have to pay a lot of attention to social media users. Facebook penetration in India is very high and the digital marketing team has already started treating it as an important referral source, may be even more than Google.  This means you will need to have a dedicated social media team, just as you have SEO team.

6. Local language

The mobile internet penetration is increasing in non-urban areas. These consumers will want to read content in their local language. In fact, many e-commerce services will need to have a language version to serve this big user base. Local content in local languages on the mobile will be a truly amazing combination.

7. Elections and social media

I have written on my blog about the effect of social media in the upcoming Lok Sabha elections. The election fever can already be felt on social media. Political parties and politicians will be using social media mainly as a two-way communication tool. They will keep a tab on the voter pulse through this medium. The advantage of social media is that politician can see the reactions first hand and in real time.

8. Video

The user base for online videos is very large because literacy doesn’t play a factor here. According to Google, almost one-third of the YouTube viewers in India access videos on their mobiles and spend over 48 hours a month on the website.  The popularity of online videos among all age groups is immense.  Earlier, YouTube was the primary platform to watch videos; today Facebook and Google+ have considerable amount of video content. Video has always been popular it will only get more popular in 2014.

Overall 2014 will be an exciting year for content players in India because of the growth of mobile internet, upcoming elections and increase in use of social networks like Facebook. Content publishers have a lot of work to do in 2014!

Are You Creative ?

They say genius and madness often overlaps. In fact, numerous studies have been done on this. For instance, research done by Shelley Carson, an associate of Harvard’s department of psychology, an expert on psychopathology, has found a connection between high levels of creativity and strange behaviour and actions.

In his book Creativity: The Work and Lives of 91 Eminent People, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, seminal professor of Psychology and Management, also the Founding Co-Director of the Quality of Life Research Center at Claremont, writes about nine traits he found in creative people. Matthew Schuler has quoted it in his blog.

Creativity

Tell us if you agree.

01

Most creative people have a great deal of physical energy, but are often quiet and at rest. They can work long hours at great concentration.

02

Most creative people tend to be smart and naive at the same time. “It involves fluency, or the ability to generate a great quantity of ideas; flexibility, or the ability to switch from one perspective to another; and originality in picking unusual associations of ideas. These are the dimensions of thinking that most creativity tests measure, and that most creativity workshops try to enhance.”

03

Most creative people combine both playfulness and productivity, which can sometimes mean both responsibility and irresponsibility. “Despite the carefree air that many creative people affect, most of them work late into the night and persist when less driven individuals would not.” Usually this perseverance occurs at the expense of other responsibilities, or other people.

04

Most creative people alternate fluently between imagination and fantasy, and a rooted sense of reality. In both art and science, movement forward involves a leap of imagination, a leap into a world that is different from our present. Interestingly, this visionary imagination works in conjunction with a hyperawareness of reality. Attention to real details allows a creative person to imagine ways to improve them.

05

Most creative people tend to be both introverted and extroverted. Many people tend toward one extreme or the other, but highly creative people are a balance of both simultaneously.

06

Most creative people are genuinely humble and display a strong sense of pride at the same time.

07

Most creative people are both rebellious and conservative. “It is impossible to be creative without having first internalized an area of culture. So it’s difficult to see how a person can be creative without being both traditional and conservative and at the same time rebellious and iconoclastic.”

08

Most creative people are very passionate about their work, but remain extremely objective about it as well. They are able to admit when something they have made is not very good.

09

Most creative people’s openness and sensitivity exposes them to a large amount of suffering and pain, but joy and life in the midst of that suffering. “Perhaps the most important quality, the one that is most consistently present in all creative individuals, is the ability to enjoy the process of creation for its own sake. Without this trait, poets would give up striving for perfection and would write commercial jingles, economists would work for banks where they would earn at least twice as much as they do at universities, and physicists would stop doing basic research and join industrial laboratories where the conditions are better and the expectations more predictable.”

Most entrepreneurs we spoke to agree to this completely. They share all the nine traits. What do you say?

4 Sectors Set for Ideas to become Billion Dollar Company

Inspired by the morning read “Indian-American teen creates 20 second mobile charger”, I set out to think about all the BIG IDEAS that could change the way the world works.

Sure, you could build a Tumblr-like site and be bought for $1.1 billion, but I’m talking about ideas that could actually make significant strides in making the world a better place.

New Battery Tech surely does look like one of those life-altering ideas. Imagine the power of these ultra-fast rechargeable cells not only in terms of better smartphones but say, in a rural setting, where power is not an oft-discussed phenomenon. The ramifications seem huge.

Big Ideas 3 part series | 12 Big Ideas that could lead to the next Billion Dollar Companies   Part 1
Here is the first part of this series of three articles which discusses ideas with major upsides:

Part 1: Education, Energy, Housing and Healthcare

Education

A sector which almost 100% of the population agrees is ripe for disruption, but changes seem to be materializing tad too slowly. This is easily the biggest existent market and the beauty of it is that it has got enough space for 10s, if not 100s, of firms to thrive about and co-exist.

India is definitely the go-to market for education and Indians have the best vantage point going forward; for the bigger long-term opportunities lie in the even less developed Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asian, Middle-Eastern and South American countries.

It becomes even more important, when one realizes the other facet, that is, the effect of better education opportunities in these countries on their healthcare, socio-political and economic systems.

Economical Solar Energy

The Sun is unmatchable when it comes to being the king of all energy sources. Nothing that human technology could ever produce would even come to touch the dominance of the Sun. Even with a very small fraction of its energy reaching the earth, the capability, if harnessed, is 10000 times that of all the commercial usage on the planet.

Scientists are working hard to bring down the initial cost of solar, but it looks like it would require someone with the passion and zeal of Elon Musk to come and turn the whole industry upside down.

Affordable Housing for the masses

An ever-increasing population coupled with a steeply increasing lifespan, gives us our next big idea. Affordable and quick-to-setup housing will make someone billions starting in the next 5-10 years.

Affordable housing includes value housing, which is the need of every middle class family, as well as low income housing, where the most significant need of India lies.

Over one-sixth population of the world lives in appalling conditions. Over a 100 million people live in slum and slum-like surroundings in India alone. They could reach up to 200 million by 2020.

Building mass-scale housing by aggregating the waste land in the outskirts of the urban hubs is the simplest solution when it comes to tackling the problem of housing due to urbanization. To make it affordable, statistics suggest that the costs should be around 5-6 times the per-capita income of the region.

Advanced Health Information Systems & Better Medicine

Even as countries like India discourage patenting in the drugs business to offset the costs of medicine to the poor, companies like Ranbaxy take undue advantage of the system and dupe billions of innocent people into buying their generic but harmful drugs.

It is a long-known fact in medical circles that different people have different levels of susceptibility to diseases and so they respond differently to medicines. But, treatments developed have been adjusted to work for the masses rather than being individualized. Advances in Genetic Science changes that and can be used to develop better systems that will be able to do fast genetic profiling of a patient.

Now, collection and management of these massive amounts of data on individual patients presents us with another opportunity in the form of Health Informatics.

Medical records, today have a prevalent problem of, being mixed up in the form of old technologies (paper) with new ones (computers). Even within the same hospital, there would be usage of different programs and platforms for different data. Sharing information over regional, national, or global networks is rendered, almost impossible.

Future healthcare systems need to be engineered to facilitate seamless sharing of data. Apart from this there should be checks in place for ensuring that the updating of this data is absolutely correct and that the profile of any individual can be easily tracked using the system.

Tomorrow I’ll discuss the next 4 BIG IDEAS as Part 2 of this series of articles.

Comment with your suggestions, on what you think are the big ideas, that could make billion dollar companies and change the world at the same time

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